Quantitative Assessment of Nanoparticle Induced Oxidative DNA Damage Using Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry

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Hyphenated mass spectrometry (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) techniques have been employed as one of the primary analytical tools for investigating the effects of ionizing radiation, chemical/biological carcinogens and oxygen derived free radicals on the induction and subsequent repair of oxidatively-induced DNA damage (DNA lesions) in living systems. Certain DNA lesions, such as 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-OH-Gua), are not only established mutagens, but have also been utilized as biomarkers of systemic oxidative stress. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has established a comprehensive research program focused on identifying and characterizing the DNA damaging mechanisms of commercially relevant engineered engineered nanoparticles (NPs) using models of increasing biological complexity through the application of isotope-dilution hyphenated mass spectrometry tools for the quantification of oxidatively-induced DNA damage. We present an overview of our recent findings from studies on metal (AuNP), metal oxide (CuO NP), and carbon-based (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) nanoparticles. For example, we did not observe in a recent study that gold nanoparticles induced DNA damage to HepG2 cells [1], but significant DNA damage was observed in plants after exposure to CuO NPs [2].

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Journal: TechConnect Briefs
Volume: 3, Nanotechnology 2013: Bio Sensors, Instruments, Medical, Environment and Energy (Volume 3)
Published: May 12, 2013
Pages: 465 - 468
Industry sectors: Advanced Materials & Manufacturing | Medical & Biotech
Topics: Environmental Health & Safety of Nanomaterials
ISBN: 978-1-4822-0586-2